Baby Storytime Songs

I Have Ten Little Fingers
(tune: Do Your Ears Hang Low)
I have ten little fingers And they all belong to me.
I can make them do things, Would you like to see?
I can open them up wide or shut them up tight
I can put them all together, Or I can make them run and hide.
I can make them jump high, I can make them fall down low.
I can make them clap fast, Or clap them soft and slow.

  • One little, two little, three little fingers
    four little, five little, six little fingers
    Seven little, eight little, nine little fingers, ten fingers on my hand.

I can make them do fun things, I can make them do fun things
I can make them do fun things, would you like to see?

I can make them jump up high . . . .

I can make them run and hide . . . .

I can clap from fast to slow . .. .

I can clap from slow to fast . . . .`

  • Bicycle, bicycle, riding on a bicycle
    With a knickknack paddy whack
    Give a dog a bone, bicycling my way home
    I bicycle here, I bicycle there, I bicycle bicycle everywhere
    With a bump and a kick, and a bump and a kick
    I bicycle bicycle quick quick quick!

  • Arms Across
    (Tune: London Bridge)
    Arms across and arms apart, arms apart, arms apart
    Arms across and arms apart,
    Kiss my baby!

Legs go in and legs go out, legs go out, legs go out
Legs go in and legs go out,
Kiss my baby!


Rickety Rocking Horse
Rickety rickety rocking horse, (bounce baby on lap)
Over the hills we go
Rickety rickety rocking horse,
Giddy-up, giddy-up, whoa!  (lean back at the whoa)


  • Skidamarink a-dink, a-dink,
    Skidamarink a-doo, I love you. (2x)

I love you in the morning,
And in the afternoon;
I love you in the evening,
And underneath the moon.

Oh, skidamarink a-dink, a-dink,
Skidamarink a-doo,
I love you.

 

Why is singing important?
Babies loooove the sound of your voice. Singing also slows down speech and breaks apart words into syllables. Why does this matter?  It comes in handy later on when your child begins to sound out words to read!Children who can hear how words come apart into separate sounds will be more successful at sounding out words when they learn to read.
What can you do to help build this skill?
Sing songs & nursery rhymes! Children love singing.  Many songs & nursery rhymes slow regular speech & break apart words into one syllable per note. Both of these help children hear the individual parts of each word.